Meetings

Cobourg and District Historical Society Meetings are held every month except May, June, July, August and December.  Meetings are held in the Citizen's Forum in Victoria Hall on the fourth Tuesday in the Month.  Meetings start at 7:30pm but coffee and cookies are available starting at 7:00pm.  Meetings are $5 for non-members and free for members of the society and students. 


More on our About page.

Ted Amsden is ending his rich tenure as Cobourg Poet Laureate this year’s end. We are pleased to present the following video as a tribute to his eloquent service to the wonderful community of Cobourg.

Unveiling of Ore Car. Ted Amsden delivers an eloquently original poem upon the unveiling of the Ore Car by Cobourg’s Heritage Harbour.

 

We are pleased to welcome back to the Cobourg Historical Society meetings author and speaker Dan Buchanan. Dan's newest book is entitled, 38 Hours to Montréal. This book chronicles the adventure of William Weller, the Stagecoach King of Cobourg who was Dan Buchananchallenged to get the Governor General from Toronto to Montreal in less than 38 hours. Dan will be entertaining us with the story chronicled in his book, outlining the adventure as it starts at Beverley House in downtown Toronto and ends at the Exchange Coffee House in Montréal. Considering the state of roads in the 1840s and the stagecoach experience, the attempt to traverse this distance in just over a day is an amazing challenge. So come to the meeting and see how Cobourg's own William Weller accomplished this feat. Dan Buchanan will also have copies of his book for sale for those of you who want to know every detail.

Join us for Dan's presentation on Tuesday, November 27, at Victoria Hall. Doors open at 7:00 PM for coffee and cookies. The meeting begins at 7:30 PM. Admission, including refreshments, is free for members and $5 for non-members. Annual membership is $25 for individuals and $30 for a family. All are welcome so bring a friend or two!

On October 23, 2018, we will be hosting Professor Christopher Dummitt, Professor of History at Trent University's School for the Study of Canada and also the co-founder of the Canada 150 project. Dr. Dummitt will be talking dummittabout the secret life of William Lyon Mackenzie King who served as Prime Minister for twenty two years and died as a respected but not particularly charismatic leader. After his death, Mackenzie King's private diaries were made public and the world learned that he was a man who led a double life. He was an eccentric bachelor who communed with the spirit world, his deceased mother and his beloved dog Pat. He also connected with prostitutes believing that he could "save" them. Christopher Dummitt's recently published book, Unbuttoned: The Secret Life of William Lyon Mackenzie King, is about both the story of the man and the story of the diaries themselves. This promises to be an intriguing evening which will raise questions about the public vs. private persona, the role of executors in destroying documents, the role of historians in exposing secrets and, of course, who William Lyon Mackenzie King really was. You can read more about Professor Dummitt and his work at https://www.christopherdummitt.com/.

Join us for Dr. Dummitt's presentation on Tuesday, October 23, at Victoria Hall. Doors open at 7:00 PM for coffee and cookies. The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. Admission, including refreshments, is free for members and $5 for non-members. Annual membership is $25 for individuals and $30 for a family.

All are welcome so bring a friend or two!

On Tuesday, September 25, we will welcome back Brian Porter for another outstanding presentation. Last October Brian and his wife excited our members with a re-creation of a speech by Sir John A. MacDonald. This time Brian will wear an original 1873 Northwest Mounted Police uniform and provide insights into the life and times of Major James Morrow Walsh.

Born in Prescott, Ontario, Major Walsh was one of the original nine officers of the NWMP set up by Sir John A. Macdonald in 1873. He endured the Great March West in 1874 and set up Fort Walsh in the Cypress Hills in 1875. His real claim to fame was meeting and befriending Sioux Chief Sitting Bull in 1877, when thousands of Sioux came to Canada after the defeat of Lt. Col. Custer. Walsh's headquarters became the Wood Mountain post, among Sitting Bull and 5,000 Sioux. During this time, Walsh was famous in the American press as "Sitting Bull's Boss". In reality Walsh was unable to fulfill his orders to convince Sitting Bull to return to the United States. The Canadian government decided that Walsh's friendship with Sitting Bull was an obstacle to the Sioux's return to the United States and in 1880 he was transferred to Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan. Soon after his transfer he took health leave and returned to Ontario. He reluctantly resigned his commission three years later.

Join us for Brian's presentation on Tuesday, September 25, at Victoria Hall. Doors open at 7:00 pm for coffee and cookies before the meeting begins at 7:30 pm. Admission, including refreshments, is free for members and $5 for non-members. Annual membership is $25 for individuals and $30 for a family. All are welcome so bring a friend or two!